How to Build a Tree Stand for Birds

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Birds are entertaining pets, and they also love to be entertained. Constant chewers by nature, they need toys to keep them busy and items to chew on. A tree stand is ideal, and they can chew to their hearts' content. Tree stands can be tall and freestanding, or they can be made to sit on a tabletop. Simple tree stands are inexpensive to make and can be customized for your pet.

A Sturdy Base is Essential

The base of your tree stand must be sturdy enough that your pet can't rock it or tip it over. Large birds, such as cockatoos, enjoy rocking and dancing; they need a secure tree stand. A half sheet of 3/4-inch plywood, cut to the desired size, makes a stable base. You can cover it with vinyl flooring for easy cleaning. Another option is a large flowerpot filled with concrete. This can be placed on a wooden plant platform with casters for easy moving.

A Safe, Edible Tree

Wood chosen for your bird's tree must be non-toxic. Good choices are oak, maple, eucalyptus or fruit trees. Cedar and pine contain resins that may harm your bird if he ingests them. Look for sturdy branches, the proper size for your bird. His claws should not completely wrap around the branches. Cut the tree, or large limb with branches, to the height you desire, and trim it to your satisfaction.

Putting It Together

If you're using plywood, drill three small recessed cavities in the bottom center of the base. This is where the screws will go. Use appropriately sized screws and secure the tree to the stand from the bottom. Galvanized screws, nails and bolts contain toxic zinc and shouldn't be used. If you're using a flowerpot and concrete, place the tree in the center of the wet concrete and secure it until it dries.

A Fun Place to Hang Out

Be creative and make a fun place for your pet to hang out. Hang toys, ropes and bird bells from the branches. Add pieces of dried fruit and other treats.Your bird will also chew on the tree, but you can easily replace it when needed. If unattended, he may leave the tree and chew your woodwork or belongings. Keep him safe and don't leave him alone when he's out of his cage.

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