How to Take Care of a Blue Crown Conure

By Lauren Corona

Measuring roughly 14 1/2 inches long, blue crown -- or blue-crowned -- conures (Aratinga acuticaudata) are fairly large members of the parrot family. Given the correct care and attention, these birds can live for more than 20 -- and possibly even up to 40 -- years, so be ready for a long-term commitment.

Home Sweet Aviary

Your blue crown conure needs to have a high-quality aviary to call home. It should be at least 20 inches wide, 20 inches deep and 36 inches tall, to give him enough room to flap, hop and climb. However, bigger is better, so get him the largest cage you can afford and have room for in your house. The bar spacing should be three-quarters of an inch to an inch. He should have several perches inside his aviary, and lots of toys to play with and chew on.

Grub's Up

To keep your blue crown conure healthy, he needs to eat the right foods. The bulk of his diet should consist of a specialized conure dry pellet or seed mix, as this will provide balanced nutrition. However, it's also important to provide your conure with fresh fruits and vegetables each day. Your bird needs foods high in calcium and vitamin K, such as kale and other leafy greens, carrot tops and tomatoes. He can eat a variety of other fruits and vegetables, too, including grapes, apples, peas and sweet potatoes.

Grooming Gripes

Your blue crown conure needs regular grooming to keep him in good condition. He may happily bathe himself if you provide him with a shallow dish of clean water. Not all conures will do so, though, so you might have to take matters into your own hands. You can either spritz him with a spray bottle of water, bathe him in the sink or even take him into the shower with you. Don't use any soap or shampoo on him, as it could leave residue on his feathers or irritate his skin. Be sure to leave him in a warm room to dry off.

Hanging Out

In the wild, blue crown conures live in large flocks and never spend time by themselves. If you don't have much spare time, you shouldn't bring a conure into your family. Someone needs to be home with your avian pal for the majority of the day, or he'll become lonely and unhappy. While these intelligent birds love to play and learn tricks, they're equally happy perched on your shoulder while you're using the computer or being petted as you watch your favorite shows.

See More Animals