Do Goats Whine All Night?

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A happy goat is a fairly easygoing pet that does not normally require a whole lot of extra maintenance and care. An unhappy goat, on the other hand, can quickly become a real nuisance. If your goat is calling out, bleating, whining and crying all night, then it's a sign that something isn't right and you need to change how you are caring for your goat.

The Lonely Goat

Goats are social animals who thrive on interaction with one another as well as with their human companions. Buying a single goat and expecting him to live alone without companionship is a recipe for disaster. Goats will always bond to someone or something, and if your goat isn't bonded to another goat who will stay with him in a herd, then he will likely bond to you. When your goat is relying on you for all of his social needs, you can expect him to cry and whine almost non-stop if you're not right there with him every minute of the day. The quickest cure for a lonely goat is a second goat, so if your goat is alone and crying all night then you need to go buy another one to keep him company.

The Hungry Goat

Your domesticated goat has limited access to resources such as food and water. He relies on you to keep him from going hungry or thirsty. If your goat runs out of food or water, then he's going to use his only means of communication to tell you about the problem. Your goat will make lots of noise, sometimes very loud noise, if he's hungry or needs a drink of water.

The Sick Goat

A goat who does not feel well, is sick or has been injured will also cry out repeatedly. If your normally quiet, happy goat is suddenly whining and crying all night then you need to thoroughly check him for signs of injury or illness. A sick goat may be lethargic, have diarrhea, a loss of appetite or remove himself from the rest of the herd. You should call your veterinarian when your goat is sick or injured.

Its Breeding Season

You may hear quite of bit of noise when your female goats go into heat or your male goats go into the rut. Goats who are in the midst of breeding season make lots of noise, primarily to communicate their intentions with one another or because they're searching for an acceptable mate. You may also hear a lot of noise from a pregnant goat or a new mother goat who is communicating with her kid. In the case of breeding-related noises, there isn't much you can do about the clamor other than waiting it out.

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Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.