Green Killing Machine Internal UV Sterilizer Instructions

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The Green Killing Machine purifies water in freshwater aquariums using the sterilizing properties of ultraviolet light. The submersible unit utilizes the aquarium's existing pump to circulate water over the surface of a 9-watt UV lamp. It requires no additional plumbing, fits in any aquarium and is safe for use in the presence of all varieties of fish. It is effective for water treatment of tanks up to a 20-gallon capacity. The Green Killing Machine operates on safe, 12-volt DC electricity.

Installation

Turn off the aquarium's existing air bubbler.

Fit the air bubbler hose to the nipple on the Green Killing Machine UV sterilizer.

Submerse the Green Killing Machine sterilizer in the aquarium and use the suction cups to attach the Green Killing Machine to the desired location on the aquarium tank wall. Make sure the entire assembly is below water level.

Attach the Green Killing Machine control box to the outside of the tank wall immediately adjacent to the submerged Green Killing Machine sterilizer. Do not attach the control box to the top of the tank or any other location where it may come into contact with water.

Connect the two-pin wire from the Green Killing Machine sterilizer to the two-pin plug on the control box. Connect the black, female wire from the DC power adaptor to the control box.

Plug the DC adaptor into a wall outlet. Turn on the air bubbler. Observe the indicator LED on the control box to verify operation.

Maintenance

Unplug the power adaptor from the wall outlet every three to five weeks and remove the Green Killing Machine sterilizer unit from the aquarium.

Remove the end cap from the unit, take the filtration sponge out of the end cap and rinse under tap water until it is clean.

Replace the sponge in the removable end cap and reinstall the end cap on the sterilizer.

Submerge the sterilizer in the aquarium and attach to the tank wall with suction cups.

Plug the power adaptor into the wall outlet and observe the indicator LED on the control box to verify operation.

Photo Credits

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Author

Gus Stephens has written about aviation, automotive and home technology for 15 years. His articles have appeared in major print outlets such as "Popular Mechanics" and "Invention & Technology." Along the way, Gus earned a Bachelor of Arts in communications. If it flies, drives or just sits on your desk and blinks, he's probably fixed it.