How to Design a Doggie Daycare

Small Dog 6 image by Valeriy Kirsanov from Fotolia.com

Starting up your own doggie daycare business can be rewarding and profitable if you do the necessary research and planning. A solid commitment and knowledge of everyday operations of a doggie daycare are essential to long-term success. The location and atmosphere of your daycare must be inviting and welcoming to both human and canine customers. To many, leaving a pet at a daycare center is like leaving their child. The same friendly and professional atmosphere is essential to customers' comfort and overall satisfaction.

Decide on the layout of your daycare. The layout needs to be both aesthetically appealing and functional in order to meet customer expectations. The ideal location is between 1,500 and 2,500 square feet and will be easy to divide into a small dog play area, large dog play area, grooming station, pet suites, lobby and office areas.

Decide what amenities and services your daycare will offer. The most profitable design comes from a 2,500-square-foot location since the area can comfortably contain 40 or more dogs and three areas of income: grooming, boarding and daycare.

Create an environment that is appealing to customers. Customers receive a first impression of your daycare by the decor and atmosphere of your lobby. Create a relaxing, homey and professional entrance by including paintings on the walls and pictures of happy pets that use your daycare services. Decorate play areas will a lot of exciting colors and play equipment. Never leave an area of your daycare colorless. White walls and plain metal equipment resemble a hospital, which will not feel comfortable to your customers.

Upgrade your facility with television, heated floors and air conditioning. Pets are considered part of the family, so anything that you would find in a human hotel will make customers feel better about leaving their pet.

Photo Credits

  • Small Dog 6 image by Valeriy Kirsanov from Fotolia.com

Author

Beginning her professional writing career in 2008 with the publication of an article in “The Chronicle,” Meagan has worked as a tutor and news writer practicing professional editing and writing in both the academic and journalistic realms. She has chosen professional writing and rhetoric as her academic interest and will graduate in May 2011 from Colorado State University-Pueblo.

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