How to Dispose of Solid Dog Waste

Properly disposing of dog waste is part of being a responsible pet owner. Pet waste can introduce bacteria into the water system as well as cause illness to people and animals who come into contact with it. Your dog's waste can be discarded in multiple ways. The method you choose may be determined by where you live, the laws in your area and the options available in your community.

When You're on a Walk

Most dog owners know you're supposed to pick up your dog's poop when you take him for a walk. In some areas, dog owners are required to do so by law. You can choose to bring a plastic bag with you or you can purchase biodegradable doggy waste disposal bags. Either way, there is no way to get around having to bring a bag of some sort with you.

After you have picked up the poop, put it in a trash receptacle. If there is no trash receptacle nearby, find one.

Tips

  • Some dog parks and walking trails may have poop baggies and trash receptacles available for your use.

When You're at Home

You have more options for poop disposal at your own home. In some areas, you can pay a specialty service to clean up your yard and dispose of the dog feces on a regular basis. If that's not an option, consider these choices:

  • Scoop the poop into plastic bags and throw them into a covered, outdoor garbage can. The covered outdoor will help to avoid flies and unpleasant odors.
  • Scoop the poop and flush it down your toilet.
  • Dig a 1 foot deep hole in your yard, place 3 to 4 inches of dog feces at the bottom of it and then bury it under at least 8 inches of soil. Change the location of the hole with every burial and try to space the holes. Make sure to keep the buried feces away from vegetable gardens.

Regardless of the disposal method you choose, make sure to check your local laws to ensure you are disposing of dog waste appropriately and in a way that is considered safe for residents of your area.

Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.