How to Get a Hound Dog to Stop Barking

By Julie Hampton

http://www.flickr.com/photos/irishfireside/

Items you will need

  • Plant mister

  • Dog toys

Hound dogs communicate through barking. Barking is a natural reaction for dogs to different situations, and not always a negative attribute. A hound dog's bark is easily recognizable due to the "baying" characteristic. Hound dogs, a working-class dog, were bred to howl during hunting expeditions. When the dog trapped or cornered prey, a loud howling sound or baying was a common reaction. Yet, excessive barking can become disturbing, and is a common reason for noise complaints with hound dog owners (and neighbors) today.

Socialize the dog. Hound dogs are pack animals and enjoy playing in groups. When excessive barking becomes a problem, one source is loneliness. Scheduling activities with other dogs such as outings to a dog park, walks in the neighborhood or a trip to a friend's home assists with socialization and can decrease restlessness.

Implement a water training method. Water training is a simple, non-harmful method to training a hound dog to stop barking. When the hound dog barks, spray two light mists of water into the dog's face. Give a command such as, "No bark," or "Quiet." Repeat after each bark. Remember to show positive reinforcement to the hound dog during training sessions.

Rotate toys. Toys will avoid boredom and allow a hound dog to focus on a specific task. By rotating toys, a dog will always have a new item to focus on. Use toys that can be filled with treats where the dog must work to remove the treat as a reward.

Take an obedience class. An obedience class will incorporate socialization with other dogs, learning training methods for the owner and interaction time between the hound dog and owner. An owner can learn new techniques from experts in the field.

Tips

  • Remember, dogs do bark for positive reasons as well. These can include if an intruder or stranger is near a home or if an alarming sound is heard. Praise a hound dog when barking occurs for positive reasons with phrases like, "Good dog," or "Thank you."

Photo Credits

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/irishfireside/

Author

Julie Hampton has worked as a professional freelance writer since 1999 for various newspapers and websites including "The Florida Sun" and "Pensacola News Journal." She served in the U.S. Army as a combat medic and nurse for over six years and recently worked as the Community Relations Director for a health center. Hampton studied journalism and communications at the University of West Florida.

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