How to Make a Cat Fence

Courtesy of morguefile.com

Items you will need

  • Flag pole brackets

  • Wood dowels (4 feet length; 1.5 or 2 inch diameter, must fit into flag pole bracket)

  • Garden netting

  • Steel fishing wire (50 lb. test line)

  • Twist ties or zip ties

  • Screw eyelets

  • Screw driver

  • Measuring tape

  • Staple gun and staples

  • Scissors

  • Ladder

Cat fences provide alternatives for pet owners who want to keep their cats safe and still let them enjoy the outdoors. Cat fences, usually a system of netting or screening, work because felines like to walk on stable ground or objects.

Screened-in rooms or lanais work well but are expensive and not always a practical alternative. There are several methods of making a cat fence.

Do a quick inspection of your existing privacy fence. Check for gaps at bottom of fence and repair or fill in with dirt. Remove excess shrub growth or trees that will interfere with installation.

Starting at one end of the fence, attach flag pole brackets to wooden fence at 6-foot intervals and 4-1/2 feet from the ground. Make sure there is a bracket at each end of fence, to ensure that once netting is installed it does not leave gaps.

Attach small screw eyelets to top of each wood dowel (one for each flag pole bracket)

Insert dowels into flag pole brackets, secure for a tight fit.

Enlist help for this portion of project.

Measure the length of netting you will need, making sure to add an additional 5 feet, and reroll netting to create a roll that's easier to handle.

Using a ladder, start at one end of the fence and unroll netting, going over the top of each pole, attach at top and bottom of each pole with twist tie or zip tie.

Starting at one end of fence, weave fishing wire through the top of netting, making sure to weave through screw eyelet at top of pole. Tie a large knot on each end to keep the wire from slipping out, and use one staple on each pole for additional strength.

Starting at one end of fence, weave fishing wire through bottom of netting, tying a large knot on each end.

Staple bottom of netting to wooden fence, near top of fence--allow about 6 inches of the netting to overlap with fence and double staple if needed for added security. Do not leave gaps.

For adding stability, weave fishing wire horizontally through netting by each pole and tie off at eyelet on top of each pole.

If have have a chain link fence or wooden picket fence, you can still create a cat enclosure. You will need: Garden netting Steel fishing wire (50 lb. test line) Garden poles (7 feet, 1 inch or more in diameter) Twist ties or zip ties Heavy duty wire Pliers Staple gun and staples Scissors Measuring tape

Do a quick inspection of your existing fence. Check for gaps at bottom of fence and repair or fill in with dirt. Remove excess shrub growth or trees that will interfere with installation.

Attach garden poles to fence along existing fence poles, placing poles about 12 inches from bottom of fence. Use pliers to wrap and twist wire at 4-inch intervals to the top of the fence. (Pole will extend above the fence.)

Measure the length of netting you will need, making sure to add an additional 5 feet, and reroll netting to create a roll that's easier to handle. Begin at end of fence and unroll netting around garden poles, netting will fall inside of fence. Attach at top and bottom of pole with twist tie or zip ties.

Weave wire through bottom of netting and staple netting to garden poles at 4-inch intervals.

Use wire to attach bottom of netting to fence. If the shorter fence is wooden, staple the netting to fence.

Tips

  • A double layer of netting adds extra security to the fence.

    If your existing fence has gaps at bottom, consider using chicken wire along the bottom of the fence to prevent your cat from getting out and to keep strays out.

Warnings

  • Check city codes and neighborhood association guidelines before installing cat fence.

    To ensure your pet's safety, do not leave it unattended the first few times it goes out in the backyard.

Photo Credits

  • Courtesy of morguefile.com

Author

Carmel Perez Snyder is a freelance writer living in Texas. She attended the University of Missouri and has been a journalist and writer for more than 13 years. Her work has appeared in newspapers across the country, the AARP Bulletin and eHow Garden Guides.