How to Make Satin Balls

Satin balls have been used for years by breeders with pregnant dogs suffering from morning sickness and no appetite. They also have become popular among owners whose dogs need to gain weight. There are numerous versions of the original recipe with different ingredients. But the basic nutritional goal is to make an appetizing, high-calorie food your dog will eat.

Nutritional Value

Satin balls are packed with meat, cereal and eggs. Raw hamburger is one of the main components of the original recipe. If your dog is not accustomed to a raw diet, introduce satin balls gradually. Satin balls can be fed as a primary diet, but they are commonly used as a supplement for underweight dogs or to spark the appetite in dogs who don't want to eat.

What You'll Need

The original recipe for satin balls consists of:

  • 10 pounds of ground beef.
  • 1 box of Total cereal.
  • 1 large box of oatmeal.
  • 1 jar of wheat germ.
  • 1 1/4 cups of vegetable oil.
  • 1 1/4 cups molasses.
  • 10 raw eggs and shells.
  • 10 envelopes unflavored gelatin.
  • Pinch of salt.  

Mix the ingredients together and separate into 10 quart-size freezer bags. Freeze and thaw to use as needed. Feed raw.

Variations

A recipe that makes less than the original with different ingredients calls for:

  • 1 pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken.
  • 1 8-ounce package of cream cheese.
  • 1 jar of natural peanut butter.
  • 1 small jar of wheat germ.
  • 1 dozen egg yolks.
  • 1 cup of flaked oats soaked in heavy cream.  

Mix; form into balls and freeze. Feed raw.

Tips

  • If you choose to feed satin balls as your dog's main meal, add an all-purpose canine vitamin supplement, available in powder or pill form. Ask your vet for recommendations for a supplement that provides a broad spectrum of vitamins. The ingredients in satin balls may not be enough to supply all the nutritional value your dog needs.

Tasty Treats

Adapt your favorite recipe for satin balls for use as treats by rolling them into bite-size bits. Freeze them in baggies to thaw as you need them.

Warnings

  • Consult with your veterinarian if your dog refuses to eat or is underweight to rule out any medical causes.