How to Remove Cat Urine With an Odor Bomb

cat 3 image by Dragan Saponjic from Fotolia.com

Items you will need

  • Detergent

  • Small washcloth

  • Rubber Gloves

  • Dust Mask

Odor bombs, or "foggers," are commonly used to eliminate unpleasant smells from fabrics, including carpets and upholstery. An economical alternative to professional services, odor bombs spray fog-like disinfectant from a pressurized canister, and require that the treated area be evacuated for at least two hours to avoid the dangerous consequences of exposure to harmful ingredients. These products are especially effective against the acrid scent of cat urine.

Pour a quarter-sized drop of detergent onto the washcloth, and dampen it with water. Use circular motions to rub out the urine stain, creating a light lather. Rinse the washcloth and use it to wipe the soap off the treated area.

Uncap the odor bomb and place it on a flat surface in the room being treated, with the nozzle facing away from you. Depress the valve until it locks into the "fogger" position catch; leave the room immediately and do not return for at least two hours.

Open doors and windows to ventilate the room for 30 minutes after you return. Place the washcloth over the top of the canister to pick it up; remove the empty odor bomb and discard immediately.

Tips

  • Read all directions and warnings on the odor bomb's label to avoid dangerous consequences from improper use. Make note of active ingredients and potential side effects; in the event of an emergency, you'll want this information available for physicians.

    Odor bombs are most commonly made for automobiles, although they are appropriate for home and office use.

    The smell of the odor bomb may be quite strong when you return to ventilate the room; it should disappear within a few days, but ventilating the room can speed the process.

Warnings

  • Wear rubber gloves and a dust mask.

    Use odor foggers only in areas that can be properly ventilated.

    Do not leave edible materials, cosmetic products, or clothing exposed in the room while the odor bomb is in use. Certain ingredients are poisonous and potentially harmful if ingested or if they come in contact with your eyes and skin.

Photo Credits

Author

Hailing from San Francisco, Arwen Petty is a market development editor for international academic publisher Cengage Learning Inc. Her work has appeared in "[X]Press Magazine," "AMP Magazine" and on StuffChicksWant.com. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from San Francisco State University.

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