How to Stop Dogs From Eating Chicken Eggs

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Items you will need

  • Heavy-gauge wire mesh

  • Fence posts

  • Bitter apple spray

  • High-value treats

If your dog lives on a farm and you happen to have chickens, chances are high your dog sooner or later may discover the delicacy of eating chicken eggs. As scavengers, canines will often resort to eating anything edible or not, that they may stumble upon. There are basically two problems with dogs eating raw eggs: the potential presence of bacteria such as salmonella and a possible interference with the proper absorption of vitamin B. (Not to mention the anger of being deprived of your eggs.) Fortunately, there are a variety of strategies to keep dogs from eating chicken eggs.

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Secure your chickens inside a pen. This will not only prevent your dog from having access to the eggs but will also protect your chickens from predators. Invest in strong, heavy-gauge wire mesh and fence posts to build a chicken pen. Remember to bury the wire mesh underground to prevent your dog or foxes from digging under the pen to gain entry.

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Make the eggs unpalatable to the dog. Simply spray the shells of eggs with bitter apple spray, a product made to discourage dogs from chewing on or eating items you want to keep from your dog. With time and persistence, the dog should no longer find the eggs palatable.

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Train your dog the "leave it" command. Put an egg on the floor and as soon as your dog goes towards it, put your hand over it. As soon as your dog backs off and shows disinterest say "Yes!" and offer a high-value treat such as steak, liver, cheese or hot dogs. Repeat until the dog understands the concept and only then add the verbal command cue "leave it." Repeat until you can keep the egg on the floor and tell your dog the "leave it" command using your voice only.

Tips

  • You can also try cayenne pepper or Tabasco sauce to coat the eggs and give a less palatable taste.

    Limiting access to the coop or pen is the best course of action.

    If you want to occasionally feed your dog eggs but are concerned about bacteria, you can offer them hard-boiled or scrambled.

Warnings

  • Never physically punish your dog for misbehaving.

Photo Credits

  • Thinkstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images

Author

Adrienne Farricelli has been writing for magazines, books and online publications since 2005. She specializes in canine topics, previously working for the American Animal Hospital Association and receiving certification from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers. Her articles have appeared in "USA Today," "The APDT Chronicle of the Dog" and "Every Dog Magazine." She also contributed a chapter in the book " Puppy Socialization - An Insider's Guide to Dog Behavioral Fitness" by Caryl Wolff.