How to Make a New Strap for a Horse Blanket

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Horse blankets are necessary pieces of winter clothing for your horse if you live in a cold climate. The problem with asking a horse to wear any type of clothing while both in the stall and turned out is that they have a tendency to damage their blankets. A broken leg or girth strap on a horse blanket can be a hazard and render your blanket unusable until it is repaired. While you can order replacement hardware online, you may not be able to wait for the item to be shipped to you if you live in below freezing temperatures. A quick repair will allow you to use the blanket until the proper replacement equipment arrives or perhaps provide the fix you need.

Step 1

Remove the old strap from the blanket, cutting it off if necessary. If you have time, wash and dry the blanket once you have removed the strap. A clean blanket is more pleasant to work on than a dirty one. Remove snaps, buckles or other hardware so you can reuse it. Pay attention to how the hardware was attached before removal.

Step 2

Cut a section of nylon webbing a couple of inches longer than the strap you just removed. Use your needle and thread to sew the hardware onto the new strap you have made from the webbing. In most cases you will need to tuck the strap through the opening on the hardware and then sew the strap back down to itself.

Step 3

Sew the replacement strap onto your blanket with your needle and thread. Make sure the new strap is sewn on snugly and is as secure as possible.

Items you will need

  • Heavy duty needle
  • Thread
  • Snap
  • Roll of nylon webbing
  • Scissors

Tip

  • Horse blanket repair kits can be purchased online from a variety of retailers, if you are missing hardware and need it replaced. If you cannot find the hardware and need your blanket fixed immediately, try tying the new strap in place as a temporary fix.

Photo Credits

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Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.