Natural Flea Control Recipe

Kim Stemmer/Demand Media

Most synthetic flea control products contain toxic poison that can harm your dog or cat. A better alternative is to find a healthy remedy that will kill the fleas without serious reactions. Fleas are blood suckers, and where there's one, you can be certain there are a multitude.

Natural Household Spray

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Just one flea bite may be enough to bring on the unbearable itching of flea-allergy dermatitis (FAD). In severe cases, the cycle of itching and scratching causes the dog's skin to thicken and the hair to fall out. The raw skin is also more vulnerable to bacterial infections.

Start by vacuuming your carpets to suck up fleas, along with their eggs. Fleas are repelled by the natural smell of eucalyptus. Focusing on spraying your house is a good start. Mix ½ tsp. eucalyptus oil mixed with water in a spray bottle. Spray the furniture, carpet, animal’s beds and, essentially, all over the house.

Natural Flea Control Recipes

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A powerful flea repellent can be made by cutting a lemon and putting the slices in boiling water. Steep it overnight. Spray on your pet, concentrating around the head and behind the ears, armpits and around the tail.

A concoction to rub on your pet can be made from cedarwood, lavender and almond carrier oil mixed together. Shake it and spread on your pet. A combination of eucalyptus, citronella, tea tree, lavender or geranium can be made and spread on the flea collar. An oil bath can be drawn for your pet, if the fleas are especially bad. Do this by adding several drops of lavender essential oils or tea tree or create an herbal flea dip by using rosemary leaf.

Sprinkle cedar chips in your backyard or along a fence to keep the fleas at bay. The tansy herb can be planted around the dog’s house to keep the fleas away, as well.

Internal and External Remedies

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Brewer’s yeast tablets are also an aid in this capacity. In addition, apple cider vinegar rubbed on the skin makes it unappetizing for fleas. If your pet begins to drool heavily and starts shaking, these are the initial warning signs that there could be chemical poisoning. It is crucial to get your pet to the vet at this point.

Photo Credits

  • Kim Stemmer/Demand Media

Author

Hunter Darden is an author of four children's books, a novel, and a black-and-white photography book. She is also a humor/inspiration newspaper columnist having written for The Charlotte Observer. Darden has a degree in psychology from Meredith College. She was the 2005 recipient of the Meredith College Career Achievement Award and the NC General Federation of Women's Clubs Excellence in Creative Writing Award.