Personality Differences for Male and Female Himalayan Cats

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Himalayans are very similar to Persian cats; it is their fur coloration that is the main differentiation between the two. They are a pale cream color with a darker pointed pattern, meaning the fur on their faces, tails, paws and ears are darker than the rest of the coat. The pointed pattern comes from the breed's heritage, crossbreeding Persian cats with Siamese cats. If you are looking to adopt a Himalayan, you may be wondering which sex would be more appropriate for your household.

General Personality

Typically, Himalayans are very easy-going cats and well-suited to household life as well as the show circuit. While many cats act aloof, Himalayans enjoy receiving affection from their owners and gladly cuddle. Himalayans may meow frequently, particularly when they want attention, but they have quiet voices.

Male Himalayans

Typically larger than females, male Himalayans are more outgoing. They take less time to warm up to their owners. Unaltered males, however, are more likely to mark their territory by spraying it. Cat's spray has a very strong and unpleasant odor, so consider neutering your Himalayan or adopting one that has already been neutered to curb this behavior.

Female Himalayans

Female cats tend to be more reserved than males and need more time to warm up to their owners and other family members. They may be slightly less playful and somewhat shy, but they retain the sweetness of a typical Himalayan cat. Before adopting a female, consider having her spayed to avoid unwanted pregnancies and the hassle of caring for a cat in heat. Female cats yowl and get more aggressive when they go into heat. Some female cats also spray to mark territory, but it is more likely to happen when they are in heat. Getting a cat spayed before it matures, can remedy this problem.

Altered Cats

The personality differences between the sexes are lessened when the cats are spayed or neutered. Females may still act more reserved, while males retain their outgoing natures, but these extremes will be lessened and you won't have to worry about finding homes for an unplanned litter.

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Author

Chelsea Anderson is a professional writer who has attended university at the Delaware College of Art and Design and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has self-published a comic and a 'zine, both of which are included in the Joan Flasch Artist's Book Collection.