How to Prevent Flea Infestation on Guinea Pigs

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Just thinking about fleas is enough to make most pet owners itch. A multimillion-dollar industry has evolved out of our desire not to find our pets and our homes filled with creepy crawly biting pests that you have to squint to see. Dog and cat owners spend thousands preventing their pets from getting fleas but guinea pig owners may have a more difficult time finding safe flea treatments for their pets. Protecting your guinea pig against getting fleas takes planning and prevention.

Step 1

Do not take your guinea pig outside if you do not want to risk him picking up fleas while he explores the outdoors. Your guinea pig can get fleas simply by walking around in areas that are flea infested.

Step 2

Treat all other pets that go outside your home with a long term preventative flea medicine. These products will keep your other pets from becoming flea infested and minimize the chances that they will bring fleas into your home where your guinea pig can become flea infested.

Step 3

Wash your hands before handling your guinea pig. If you have been handling an animal you suspect might have fleas you may want to change your clothes as well.

Step 4

Keep your guinea pig's living enclosure clean and replace all bedding regularly. The cleaner his environment is the less likely it will be that he develops a severe parasite problem even if he does happen to get fleas.

Step 5

Check your guinea pig for fleas on a regular basis. Excessive itching, scratching or visible flea dirt on your guinea pig's skin and fur are signs of a flea problem. Treat your guinea pig with a flea shampoo or spray that has been recommended by your veterinarian.

Tip

  • Handling your guinea pig regularly will help you notice protential problems before they become serious.

Warning

  • Flea infestation can be a serious problem and lead to severe health consequences if left untreated. If you cannot get your guinea pig's fleas under control quickly, you need to discuss treatment options with your veterinarian.

    Photo Credits

    • Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

    Author

    Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.