How to Use Equine Mirrors Indoors

Ian Forsyth/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Horseback riding instructors observe your riding and provide instruction for improving your skills. Most riders learn from instructive lessons and continue to work on improving cues, skills and position during the times in between the lessons. Strategically placed mirrors on the walls of your indoor arena can make it easier to practice your skills and spot your own mistakes while riding.

Riding With Mirrors

Mirrors can be useful for an equestrian who frequently rides alone in an indoor arena. While it is easy to envision what you are supposed to look like when you are riding your horse, it can be quite a bit more difficult to determine whether you are maintaining the correct riding position and keeping your horse in the right frame for travel. Hanging mirrors on the walls of your indoor arena can make it significantly easier to observe your position while riding and make the necessary corrections so you are performing cues and movements correctly.

Mirror Placement

The number of mirrors you use in your arena is a matter of practicality and preference. Riders often benefit from more mirrors placed throughout the arena because the mirrors allow them to quickly check their position and make corrections without having to search for the mirror.

Design

Hard-to-break acrylic mirrors are the kind that serve in riding arenas. These mirrors can take a significant amount of abuse without shattering or posing a danger to horses or riders. The mirrors that serve in an arena are usually fairly large so riders can see their own posture and their horses at a glance. Mirrors that go from the floor to the ceiling or that stretch the length of an entire wall are considered the most useful.

Other Uses

Some horse people use mirrors inside their barns as well as in the arena. You can place them so that a horse who is lonely or exhibits vices can see his own reflection or view other horses. You can place mirrors so that an individual standing in one position in the barn can see inside of stalls or into other locations, such as the wash rack or cross ties.

    Photo Credits

    • Ian Forsyth/Getty Images News/Getty Images

    Author

    Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.