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How Deep Do Moles Dig?

By Jodi Thornton O'Connell

Telltale dirt hills and raised tube-like areas on your lawn can be the first signs that you have a mole living on site. Moles come to feast on grubs, earthworms and other insects found just under the soil's surface. Though considered a pest, they help control populations of other pests, including centipedes, millipedes, termites, ants and crickets. Because they feed close to the surface, you'll find mole tunnels are limited to the first few feet below ground.

Digging Deep

Most of the mole's tunnels run just under surface level and can be easily seen as raised areas of lawn or soil. These tunnels are used to find prey in the soil and to access a mate during breeding season. The shallow tunnels are built at rates of up to 12 inches each minute with the mole's powerful front claws. Deeper permanent tunnels and nesting areas descend to 40 inches below the Earth's surface and are dug out at rates of about 15 feet per hour.

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Author

Indulging her passion for vacation vagary through the written word on a full-time basis since 2010, travel funster Jodi Thornton-O'Connell guides readers to the unexpected, quirky, and awe-inspiring.

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