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How to Massage Dog Ears

By Karin Barga | Updated September 26, 2017

Canine massage is a natural treatment that involves running and kneading the muscles and joints with human hands to relieve pain and tension. Massage benefits include improved blood circulation, increased joint lubrication, waste elimination, better digestive system efficiency and so much more.

Tips

  • Before beginning a canine ear massage, wash your hands to remove any lotions, perfumes, lingering food aromas or other trace scents that may distract them. Unwashed hands can spread infection inside the ears.

Beginning the Massage

Lightly massaging the head in the direction of the hair growth with the fingertips helps stimulate the brain, increase blood circulation, increase natural oils in the scalp and aid in relaxation. Utilizing a light tapping massage movement called tapotement assists in brain stimulation and blood circulation. It is important throughout the massage to keep at least one hand on the dog at all times, so as to not break the sense of relaxation and stimulation.

Working on the Ears

Once the dog is relaxed, move along to the massage the ears. A light ear pull is beneficial for all breeds, and especially those with large ears, which are more prone to ear infections. Massaging the pinna, commonly known as the ear skin flap, arouses blood circulation and activates acupressure points. Next, cupping the base of the ear between the hands, massage the ear by gently rotating the base and flaps in a circular motion on the head to open up the inner ear canal.

Completing the Massage

To complete the canine ear massage, glide each ear flap between a thumb and index fingertip, with a gentle pull and slight pressure at the tips, where an acupressure point used to stabilize and center energy is located. If you would like to continue your pet pampering, move on to massaging the body and legs.

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Author

Karin Barga contributes to various online publications, specializing in topics related to canines, equines and business. She earned career diplomas in bridal consulting, business management and accounting essentials. Barga is a certified veterinary assistant, holds certification in natural health care for pets, and is a licensed realtor and property manager.

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